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THE EDITOR'S FAREWELL

Well, the day I have looked for during the past six years has come at last! But my feelings are very mixed. The last number of the News Letter would betoken the return of the large majority of our boys and girls to their homes and thus to the village community. This, I knew, and the thought of that glad day made me eager to see the last issue. But the letters I have received week by week from those away, my delight in reading them carefully, and taking extracts from them for the purpose of passing them on to others scattered throughout the world, and the very close contact I was making week by week with my friends and companions now far distant; these are pleasures that this last issue proclaims will be mine no more.

I cannot lay down my pen without thanking my many correspondents for their interesting chatty letters which have helped so much to make the N.L. acceptable to its readers.

Then I must thank those many friends in Tarleton who were always so ready to give me interesting items of local news. They helped me very considerably as I went snooping and nosey-parkering round the parish in search of "the very latest."

I tender my most sincere thanks to Miss Evelyn Webster for undertaking the prodigious task of addressing and stamping the envelopes each week for the past six years. Just imagine it! Throughout these years she has folded 100,000 NLs, put them in envelopes, addressed them (and most of the addresses changed in some slight degree each week), licked 100,000 stamps and stuck them on, and has posted 100,000 NLs in the village post box. I am most grateful to her.

Then I must thank those kind friends who have contributed quite considerable sums towards the cost of the News Letter. I cannot truthfully say that without such aid the NL would not have been sent, for it would; but I am truly grateful for their assistance.

Finally, I must thank Brown's Typing Services of Burnley, for duplicating the NLs so expeditiously each week, and for always doing exactly what I asked them to do. That is the kind of service one appreciates.

And now, to all my readers, farewell. To be able to talk to you in the flesh will be far more pleasant and more satisfying, than having to summon you to my mind as I wrote the NL each week.

And one thing I do ask. We have been such good, intimate friends while separated by hundreds and, in cases, thousands of miles; now that you are home, don't bury yourself in Tarleton so that I never see you, or hear of you. The rectory door is ever open. There is certainly a bell, but it is not there for the use of my friends; so walk right in, and if I am not in sit thee down; I shall not be long away; and nothing pleases me more, when I do come in, than to see a welcome friend sitting in one of my easy chairs reading a paper or one of my many books. It's a real tonic for my tired, old body and mind. And remember, I am your servant whenever you need to make use of me; but that you have known a very long time.

So farewell, dear old N.L. my constant anxiety for six long years, and welcome readers, a thousand times welcome, back to your homes, your loved ones, and your old friend the rector, who is also THE EDITOR.

__________

TARLETON'S CONTRIBUTION TO THE NATION'S WAR EFFORT

Throughout the whole of Great Britain few villages of the population of Tarleton can have made a bigger contribution towards winning the war than did our own.

It is as well, therefore, in this final issue of the News Letter to put on record what the village actually did during these years of war.

1. Three hundred and ten of our boys and girls were in one or other of the fighting Services, and most of them saw service abroad. Our lads fought at Dunkirk, North Africa, Greece, Italy, Singapore, the Malay Archipelago, France, Belgium, Germany, Austria, etc. They also saw service in Iceland, Canada, South Africa, India, America, Burma. They served in every conceivable kind of seafaring vessel from battleships to submarines.

2. Immediately the war was declared the Tarleton Red Cross came into existence with Miss Alty as President, Mrs. Lawrence Croft as Chairman, Mrs. Barton as Treasurer, and Mrs. Stanley Dean as Secretary, and a bevy of hard-working ladies on the Committee. And here is what they accomplished during the war: They collected over £2,000 in cash for the Red Cross Society; they cut out and made 8,000 garments, all of which went to prisoners-of-war, or hospitals, or blitzed families in England.

3. Directly the call came, after Dunkirk in 1940, for volunteers for the LDV (the name was changed almost immediately to the Home Guard), a meeting was held in the British Legion Club, under the Chairmanship of the rector, and that night our local Home Guard came into existence. Captain S.D. Dean, Manager of the District Bank, was the first Officer in Command of the local platoon, with Mr. James Melling as second in Command. Later Captain Dean went to Battalion Headquarters and Lieut. James Melling took over the Command. The other Officers of the platoon were Lieut. David Ball, Lieut. George Kemp and Lieut. Robert Spencer, with Mr. Richings of New Road as the Sergeant Major.

3. A local branch of the NFS was formed with Mr. Harry Hodge as the Company Officer, and Mr. Norman Dandy and Mr. George Duxbury as Section Leaders. They commenced with Headquarters at Plox Brow, but later commodious premises were built in Thompson's field in Hesketh Lane and housed five pumps. These premises also contained a recreation room for the NFS personnel, and sleeping accommodation. During the blitz they were called out to Liverpool.

4. One of the first organisations to be formed in the parish was the A.R.P. Of this Mr. Gilbert Marsden was the Head Warden, Mr. George Gregson and Mr. William Morrison were Senior Wardens, and Mr. Nicholas Topping and Mr. John Rogers were Second Wardens. They did very useful work throughout the war.

5. The Ambulance Section under the Command of Mr. Levi Halstead, with Mr. Albert Greenwood and Mr. Reg Taylor holding responsible positions, did a wonderful work. First Aid classes were held weekly in the Mission Room in Hesketh Lane. The people of Tarleton and Hesketh Bank subscribed over £500 to buy an up-to-date motor ambulance, and garage in which to house it.

6. The British Legion (Women's Section), with Mrs. Lawrence Croft as President, Thomas Tindsley as Chairman, Mrs. William Iddon as Secretary and Mrs. James Melling as Treasurer, made a notable contribution to our village war effort. They made gifts to every boy and girl who was called up; sent substantial gifts to them each Christmas, and helped financially the families of Servicemen whenever such help was obviously needed.

7. The useful work done by our squad of Special Constables must not go unrecorded. In such an orderly parish as Tarleton Constables are not much needed, but throughout the war our Special Constables were here, there and everywhere, rendering efficient help where it was most wanted. They did great work during the blitzes.

8. Last, but by no means least, record must be made of the inestimable work done by the W.V.S. Beginning with Mrs. Lawrence Croft, Miss Alty and Mrs. McCarthy in command, they took full charge of the influx of evacuees from Liverpool, finding them accommodation, and feeding them when necessary. It was very hard and anxious work, but they accomplished it without a hitch. Later Mrs. Fred Webster took over the Command with Mrs. Thomas Sutton and Mrs. Annie Johnson as her assistants. In addition to their other exacting work they took entire charge of issuing ration books to the whole of Tarleton.

9. A word must be said of the rector's News Letter. It commenced in May 1940, and has been sent each week without fail to every boy and girl serving in H.M.Forces. It finishes publication with this number. Here are a few interesting facts concerning the News Letter.

100,000 copies have been sent by post to their recipients throughout the war.
The cost of the postage stamps alone came to £800.
Each NL cost 3/4d. to produce and the total cost of producing the News Letter throughout the war came to £313.
The total cost of the envelopes used came to £140.
Add these sums together and it will be seen that the grand total cost of sending the NLs to those away throughout the war came to the substantial sum of £1,253.
This does not include the cost of this very large final number. What that will come to we cannot say, as the printer has not yet sent in his account.
Mention should be made of the fact that the Tarleton NL has been copied by literally hundreds of parishes throughout England, Scotland and Wales and in fewer instances in Canada and South Africa.

___________

No.310 ISSUED WEEKLY SINCE MAY 1940 Final Issue

RECTOR'S WEEKLY NEWS

Tarleton Rectory,
Preston
August 24th 1946

My dear Boys and Girls,
Here, at last, really does come the very last of my weekly News Letters to you. For over six year I have spent every Saturday night and Sunday after Church, writing my NL to you and trying to make it as interesting as possible for you all.
Another thing that's comes to an end with this issue is my calling you boys and girls. When you left home that appellation was correct, but now you are the veterans, much travelled men and women. How time does hurry on!
One thing I would like to ask before I lay down my pen. It is this. As children I knew you all, or nearly all, extremely intimately. You were my constant companions. Throughout the war I have known you, if that were possible, even more intimately. Now you have returned home and, as in many cases, taken upon you the responsibilities of family life, I do hope that you will still regard me as your elder brother, and still make your visits to the rectory as frequently as of yore. Don't, for goodness sake, begin to be formal; don't ring the bell and stand like a stranger at the front door, but, as in the days of old, open the door and walk in. I am none the less your brother because you are now grown up. I am here to help you-in fact that is absolutely the only reason I am here-to help you in your material as well as in your spiritual life. Use me in both these ways, and I shall be happy. With my love, and, as long as I live, with my prayers for you all, and with every blessing I am able to bestow.
Ever your affectionate old friend and rector, L.N.FORSE.

HOME FRONT NEWS.
Frank Foster was married in Eccleston Parish Church on Saturday, August 3rd, to Margaret Annie Edmondson of Ulnes Walton. The bride is a sister of Mr. William Edmondson, Croston, who married Millborough Pendlebury. Reception at bride's home; honeymoon at Llandudno.
Last week the Rev. C. Andrews brought 24 scouts from the parish of St. Luke, Warrington, and camped in the Rectory field. As it was very wet most of the time they slept every night in the old Scout room, or as it has been more recently named the Home Guard room over the rectory garage.
Frank Foulds has been seriously ill in hospital at Kalyan, Bombay, India; he is now reported convalescent.
Major-General George Surtees, C.B., D.S.O., M.N., etc., who is now Commander in Chief of the British Forces in the Hamburg area, came to Bury on Saturday, August 3rd to receive the Freedom of the Town which had been given to the Lancashire Fusiliers, whose depot is at Bury. As the rector has known the Major-General for over thirty years, he went over to Bury to see him.
The Wesleyan Tennis Club held a Garden Party on their ground in Sutton Lane on Saturday, August 3rd. Marshside Band was in attendance.
The third Welcome Home Party for those recently demobbed was held in the schools on Friday, July 26th. It followed the same lines as the previous two - sumptuous tea, in spite of rationing. Thanksgiving Service in Church, dance in School. About 200 attended.
The rector is taking a holiday in France after the great Victory and Welcome Home Day, which has been fixed for Saturday, August 24th.
Mere Brow had its own Victory Day on Saturday, Jul 13th. In good weather an imposing procession went from Holmes Chapel to the Southport New Road, then back to the Mere Brow Schools. Tea in the two chapel schools, sports on field on other side of Runner Platt, dance in C.E. school at night.
A small contingent of Pioneers are now billeted at Bank Hall.
Mrs. Will Dandy (nee Alice Wright of Mere Brow) has presented her husband with a son.

EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS.
Fusilier Ronnie Iddon writes from India: "I shall be coming home on leave any day now. I don't know whether I shall stay in England when my leave is up or not. I may be sent to Germany, but I certainly shall not be sent out here again. Out here everything is much the same, only the rains have started; and it doesn't half come down when it starts. Manchester still has a long way to go yet to catch up with it. Remember me to Jack Hodge at Colombo, also to Bob Iddon (from Bretherton, was with Jack Mee) in Japan."
L.A.C. John Sutton writes from SIND, India Command: "We are getting cleared from Mauriput, and as far as I'm concerned it's a good riddance to a filthy country. According to the 'gen', we should be away to Bombay to await the 'dinghy' to bring us home by August 10th. The 'moon-men' fresh from Blighty tell us dismal tales of food, cig. and beer shortages back home, but I hardly think that whatever bit of grub we shall get will ever come up to the dehydrated spuds and cabbage diet we've been starving on out here. I see that Hugh Melling has got to Japan, but he won't have much of a stay, as he is in the same group number as myself, and he should be on the way home now."
Pte. Jimmy Southern writes from SINGAPORE; "I have got my 'B' release and hope to catch the next boat home. I have just missed the Empress of Australia, and have to wait now for the Mauretania. I am having a nice time in this Transit Camp, good food, nothing to do, and all day to do it in. I am looking forward to meeting all my old pals again, especially Arthur Procter and Horace Hornby. To all Tarletonians still in the Forces I wish the very best."
Sergeant Kenneth Nicholson, Royal Marines, writes from his ship, 'H.M.S. Colossus,' now off Ceylon: "I hope that this letter reaches you before your last NL goes to press. Since I came here my NLs have been passed round and read by every marine on board. Many of them come to me and say; 'Any News Letters, Nick?', and they have a fight as to who shall have it next. The regular writers to the NL are as well known to them all on board as they are to me who knew them in civvy street. It is just six years since I volunteered for the Royal Marines, and it would take the whole of this page to name all the places I have visited. Our Admiral told us that there was no chance of home for at least six months; and then, like a bolt from the blue, the Admiralty have sent for us, and we are to arrive in Portsmouth on July 20th."
L.A.C.Tom Bolton (was at Tarleton Co-op before the war-lives at Longton) writes from M.E.F.: "I would hate to think that I had not given you my many thanks for sending me the NL during the past five years. It most certainly has been a wonderful link with the old surroundings, and many others here have enjoyed reading it also. I suppose that the majority of the lads and lasses are back home now, all except a few unfortunate ones, who, like myself, are being held back for some unknown reason. Still, in three or four months I hope to be back myself, which is a very pleasant thought. Remember me to Mr. Bailey and the Staff at the Co-op., and tell them that I shall be paying them a visit some day."
Lieut. Mick Melling writes from H.Q., B.A.O.R.: "I am writing as you suggested in order that you may have a real bumper number for the final issue of the NL. I would like to express my appreciation of the work you have done in keeping us all in touch with all the events of the village and with each other. I am keeping well, and fairly happy out here in Germany, but am looking forward to the date when I can say good-bye to the Continent, and return home. Give me England any day, even though we get so much rain at home."
Pte. Jackie Sutton writes: "I am now on an Infantry Course and it is sure tough. We get a lot of square bashing and rifle drill, and a tremendous lot of P.T., so we are keeping fit. Today the pop wagon came along, and we broke off for a big pint cupful of lemonade. The food is very good here, and very clean, but there is not enough of it. They tell us that this course is for going overseas; it is a sort of revision of our primary training. I was surprised when I heard that Malcolm Cropper and Eric Adams had been called up. We have some men here who have recently been called up who are 30 years old. They are very hot on rifles here for inspections. You know these R.S.Ms; well, if you don't know, who does."
Pte. Arnold Bailey writes from Blackdown: Today all the lads have had orders to walk about in their shirtsleeves. I am here waiting for posting, and all I am doing till then are fatigues, that's a thing I don't like. I notice that they have started a football club again in Tarleton. I hope that there are some good players, for it will be alright if they win, and fetch the Southport Cup home to Tarleton. Thanks for the ticket for the Welcome Home Party. I am sorry I could not come, but I had no girl to bring with me."
Peter Bryan, who is still training on H.M.S. "Ganges" writes: "I hope to go on destroyers some time in August. We have already been out at sea on two time trial trips, and I like them very much. When we finish our training on Destroyers we are to be drafted to H.M.S. 'Ulster'. That will be on Nov. 17th. It was very quiet here on the anniversary of VE Day. The only thing that happened to me was that I had all privileges stopped for a month; and, just imagine, they gave us a whole 6d. to spend on that day! Please remember me to all the lads in the village and let them read this letter."
L.A.C. Freddy Coupe writes from Teddington: "I shall be due for release in about six weeks, and I am certainly looking forward to it. As you will see I am stationed just outside London, and so I manage to see Raymond quite often. Thanks for the invitation to the Welcome Home Party which had been forwarded from home. That's about all my news; so I will now sign off."
Bevin Boy George Caunce writes from the mines at Walkden: "I have received your very welcome NLs regularly since I came to the mines, but it is very hard to tell you how much I and the other boys will miss them when they cease coming. Well, all the others seem to be getting demobbed, except poor old me. I have to wait until Group 64 comes around, which I think will be about next May. Please remember me through the NL to all the lads who are still doing their bit.

BRAIN TWISTERS.
1. Tom, Dick and Harry each had a money box, and the total sum in the three boxes was 45s. If Tom's money as divided by three, Dick's divided by two, and Harry's diminished by 3s. they would each have had the same amount. One box contained one coin, another contained two coins, and the third contained four coins (count a note as a coin). What was in each box?
2. What are the maximum and minimum lengths and breadths of a football field? What is the length of a cricket pitch (between wickets)? What are the outside measurements of the sidelines and baselines of a tennis court?
3. Can you makes words of the following: MAER, UNDE, LISK, URNE, ABLE, CRAAW, DEED, ICIL, BREN, by prefixing or inserting the letters forming these well-known abbreviations: - A.R.A., B.A., C.O.D., D.D., O.B.E., M.A., B.C.L., O.K., C.I.D. (the abbreviations are not in the same order as the original letters).
4. Including London there are thirteen counties in England that do not end in "shire". Can you name them?
5. A -----
-A----
--A---
---A-
----A-
-----A
Turn the dashes into letters so that they make boys' and girls' names alternately, and they must fit in with the letter "A" as shown.
6. In a Church collection there were 429 coins, consisting of sixpences, shillings, florins and half crowns. By a strange coincidence there was exactly the same amount of money of each denomination. How much did the collection total?

THE LIGHTER SIDE.
A sympathetic padre was talking to a worried-looking sailor. "Well, tell me what the trouble is, and I'll help you to get it off your chest," said the padre. "That's just what you can't do, sir," replied the disconsolate seaman, "I've got Annie tattooed on my chest, and now I am going to marry Joyce."

"Funny how our tastes change as we grow up."
"What do you mean?"
"Well, little girls like painted dolls, and little boys like soldiers; but when they grow up the girls like the soldiers and the boys go after the painted dolls."

"Looks like rain," said the talkative waiter.
"Yes," replied the customer, "but it smells a little like soup."

The Corporal was reading a letter from home. "My wife writes," said he to his mate, "that she is attending a course of lectures on Domestic Silence."

The skipper, writing up his log recording an eventful day, rounded off his report with the entry "Mate intoxicated." To the mate's indignant protest the skipper retorted, "Well, it's true, ain't it?"
Next day the mate had to write up the log, and he ended his account with the words, "Skipper sober." The captain stared at this for a moment, then exploded. "Well, it's true, ain't it?" said the mate triumphantly.

"When her father threw you out of the back door, what did you say?"
"I told him I resented his action, that my family were important people, and that we were not accustomed to such low behaviour."
"What did he say to that?"
"He begged my pardon, asked me in, and then threw me out of the front door."

Mrs.Smith: "I took the recipe for this cake out of my new cookery book, dear."
Mr. Smith: "You did quite right darling, it should never have been put in."

Sailors boast about having a girl in every port; but soldiers prefer to see that there is a port in every girl.

Baby was yelling the house down. The distracted mother asked. "Oh dear, what shall I do with baby?"
"Didn't you get a book of instructions with it, mother?" asked her other little one.

TROOPSHIP CHANT
My breakfast lies over the ocean,
My dinner lies over the sea,
My tummy's in such a commotion -
Please don't mention supper to me.

"Last year," said the worried-looking man to his friend, "I proposed to Gladys, and she turned me down, so to spite her I married her mother. That made Gladys my daughter. But my father married Gladys, and that made my daughter my mother, my father my son-in-law, and my wife my grandmother. What is worrying me now is that I am almost certain that I am my own grandfather.

"What is the next train to Southport?"
"Twelve o'clock, sir."
"Good heavens, isn't there one before that?"
"No, sir, we never run one before the next."

Severe portly old gentleman in a non-smoking compartment in the Underground, to young flapper just starting to light a cigarette, "Young woman, it says 'NO SMOKING' up there!"
Young flapper: "I know, but it also says 'WEAR NEETPHORME CORSETS,' so what!"

TRAGEDY AT THE RECTORY
My tenderness of heart has always been my greatest weakness, and more than once has caused me endless trouble. It was the primary cause of my adopting little Janette. I never knew her father, but her mother was struggling to bring up a large family, all of whom appeared to be totally unwanted. It was pathetic, and when little Janette turned her big eyes on me with an appealing look, I fell at once. Yes, I would formally adopt her and bring her up. I would introduce her into respectable society and bring her up in a refined atmosphere. So I took her home and handed her over to the tender care of my housekeeper. She was a really lovely baby, with her large appealing eyes, her soft fluffy hair glistening like silk, and her playful ways. As she grew up I loved her still more. She was no trouble and obviously appreciated the care I took to make her life a happy one. Nothing pleased her more than to sit on the arm of my chair when I came in at night and got down to my writing. Withal, she was a thorough tomboy. To see her lithe young figure romping with my dog Jack on the tennis court in front of my window was a pleasure to behold. She would climb the trees and call to him to try and follow her. I knew, however, that beneath the calm serenity that she displayed on normal occasions there lay a hidden reserve of very violent temper. I have seen her eyes, so large and beautiful, and usually so calm, flash with fire as anyone rubbed her the wrong way. Anyone, that is, except myself. I could say, or do, anything to her, and she never took offence. But I knew that she had no real control over her temper. I have seen her spit with indignation at those who offended her. Quite honestly I dreaded the day when her high-strung temper would put me in some dilemma. I suppose she had inherited it from her father, whom, as I have said, I never knew; for her mother seemed placid enough. As she grew up she became my constant companion, and a very delightful one, too. Not tall, but very stately, graceful and self-possessed, she was admired by all who came in contact with her. Then it happened.
I had seen him prowling around, and had taken an instinctive dislike to him. He was a large hulking brute, with beady, furtive eyes, pot-bellied and gross in every respect. Besides he had that hesitating, crawly gait that always betokens a shady mind. What was he doing hanging about the rectory? I would not have him there. One night, as I came in by the front door at dusk, I actually saw the creature, yes! I can call him nothing else; I actually saw the creature slinking down the passage that leads to the side door. I summoned Janette at once. She came, I thought, a little flustered and distraught. I told her plainly that I would not have the fellow across my doorstep. I told her that she must get rid of him once and for all. I cared not how she did it, but she must give him his conge. She never said a word, but looked at me with her large appealing eyes. Her silence riled me, and I regret to say that for the first, and I hope the last, time I lost my temper with her. I stormed and raved. Then she lost her temper also, and I really cannot blame her. Her eyes literally flashed fire. I had thoroughly put her back up. Then, with one spiteful spit at me, she fled from the room. I was worried all the evening, for I had seen nothing of Janette since my display of bad temper, and I supposed that she had gone to bed. I went upstairs myself very early that evening, but I could not sleep. Then, as I lay half awake in bed, about midnight I heard a most unearthly shriek coming from the hall, followed by a terrific crash of glass. I was up in a minute, and flinging a dressing gown around me made my way downstairs.
Never, as long as I live, shall I forget the sight that met my eyes as I switched on the light. It was as if an atom bomb had suddenly exploded, and lying in the midst of the debris, in a pool of blood, lay the body of the creature I loathed. Beside it stood my darling Janette with her body taut and her eyes ablaze with murderous fire. Janette had killed her first rat. I pleased me to know that I possessed not only a fine looking cat, but also a first-class ratter.

ANSWERS TO BRAIN TWISTERS
1. Tom, 20s.,1s.; Dick, 5s.,5s.,2s.,2s.; Harry 10s.
2. Football field-130yds long,100 yds wide - Maximum
100 yds long, 50 yds wide - Minimum.
Cricket pitch - 22 yds. Tennis court - 78ft. and 36 ft.
3 1.Madder.2 Unmade. 3.Obelisk. 4.Urbane. 5.Arable. 6.Crabclaw
7. Decided. 8. Codicil. 9. Broken.
4 London, Northumberland, Durham, Cumberland, Westmorland, Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, Kent, Surrey, Cornwall, Middlesex.
5 Arthur; Martha; Claude; Hilary, Thomas; Pamela. (There are, of course, many other names which would fit in quite as easily as those given above; but they must be those of a boy and a girl alternatively.)
6 £22 (220 sixpences; 110 shillings; 55 florins; and 44 half-crowns).

__________

OUR COMRADES

who will ever be held in most grateful remembrance as those who were called upon to make the Supreme Sacrifice that our children might retain the Freedom for which their forebears fought of old.

==========

"But each one, man by man, has won imperishable praise, each has gained a glorious grave-not that sepulchre of earth wherein they lie, but the living tomb of everlasting remembrance wherein their glory is enshrined ; remembrance that will live on the lips, that will blossom in the deeds of their countrymen the world over. For the whole earth is the sepulchre of heroes ; monuments may rise and tablets set up to them in their own land, but on the far-off shores there is an abiding memorial that no pen or chisel has traced ; it is graven, not on stone or brass, but on the living heart of humanity. Take these men for your example. Like them, remember that prosperity can only be for the free, that freedom is the sure possession of those alone who have the courage to defend it." - From the Funeral Oration of Pericles.

Ronald Kerruish Trevor Adams
Richard Johnson Albert Pennington
Glynn Owen Richard Parker
James Latham Robert Moss
Thomas Parkinson George Hunter
James Sutton  

==========

And thus they passed : we the task inherit
The unfinished task for which their lives were spent;
But leaving us a portion of their spirit,
Full well they knew they could not build without us
That better country, faint and far decried,
God's own true England : but they did not doubt us -
And in that faith, and for that faith, they died.

==========

In that place of Light, whence sorrow and mourning are far banished, grant them eternal rest, O Lord, thou Lover of men.

__________

OUR ACCOUNTANT

Our readers will notice that the Welcome and Welfare Fund has been officially audited by Mr. H. H. Sanderson, Chartered Accountant, of 2, Cross Street, Preston. We have to thank Mr. Sanderson for having given arduous service free of all cost. He has been most helpful and generous to us.

OUR CARTOONS

We also owe a real debt of gratitude to the Editor and Proprietors of Punch for allowing us to reproduce two cartoons appearing last week in that very entertaining journal. The one is by Illingsworth, who also is the official cartoonist to the Daily Mail ; while the other is by that consistently amusing cartoonist, Acanthus, whose real name we do not know. Both these artists are in the forefront of the world's humourists.

SKETCH OF CHURCH AND SCHOOLS

Everyone in North West Lancashire knows the artist skill of Mr. W. C. Furnival, the Cartoonist to the Lancashire Daily Post, for all have enjoyed his "To-night's Smile," and his extremely effective Cartoons. We are most grateful to him for making the sketch of the Church and Schools which appear in this number.

OUR PRINTERS

This last great number of the N.L. has been printed by Messrs. W. S. Heane, Ltd., of Fishergate, Preston, who also print our Parish Magazine. They can always be relied upon to do good work, and have taken the utmost pains to make this issue of the N.L. a truly memorable number. We owe an especial word of thanks to Mr. Armitstead, the Father of the Chapel, for his experienced advice so readily given in preparing this issue. He knows his job from beginning to end, and is always ready to put his great knowledge of printing at the service of those who seek it.

BROWN'S TYPEWRITING SERVICES

Week by week, as all now know, the News Letter has been duplicated by Brown's Typewriting Services, Brougham Street Works, Burnley. They are most efficient. Work sent one day comes back duplicated the following day. They are also most obliging. Many a time has the rector rushed across to Burnley to make some alteration in the MSS sent, and even though it was actually on the Gestetner the alteration has been made without a murmur by the firm, or by the good lady working the machine. It is well worth while making a note of the name and address of this Firm by those who may, at any time, have need of duplication to be done.

OUR LANGUAGE!

Have you heard the story of the young Harrow boy, a keen lepidopterist, (if you don't know the word look it up in your dictionary), who went into a bookshop and said, " I will take that book on Mothcollecting in the window." The salesman said there was no such book. The boy took him into the street and showed it to him. It was labelled: CHAVASSE ; ADVICE TO A YOUNG MOTHER.

__________

RECIPIENTS OF THE TARLETON GRATUITY.

1939
Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
Noel C. Clark
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Walter A. Moss
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Thomas H. Burns
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Frederick L. Croft
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Frank E. Croft
Sept. 1939
Mar. 1941
19
Arthur I. Croft
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Edgar Wait
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
James Leacy
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Joseph R. Wait
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
George E. J. West
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Stanley Baldwin
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Ronald Kerruish
Sept. 1939
R.I.P.
72
Richard Rymer
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Robert Watson
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
John Caunce (Commander)
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Kenneth Nicholson
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Clifford Hambilton
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Trevor Adams
Sept. 1939
R.I.P.
72
Edwin Crabtree
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Richard Johnson
Sept. 1939
R.I.P.
72
Samuel Daniels
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Albert Pennington
Sept. 1939
R.I.P.
72
Abraham Wright
Sept. 1939
Aug. 1945
72
Austin Barton
Sept. 1939
Apr. 1944
56
Glynn Owen
Sept. 1939
R.I.P.
72
Ronald Pilkington
Oct. 1939
Aug. 1945
71
Thomas Herbert Nutter
Oct. 1939
Aug. 1945
71
Henry Latham
Oct. 1939
Aug. 1945
71
Arthur E. Molyneux
Oct. 1939
Aug. 1945
71
Henry Price
Nov. 1939
Aug. 1945
70
John Robinson
Dec. 1939
Aug. 1945
69
Hubert Tindsley
Dec. 1939
Aug. 1945
69
Francis Foster
Dec. 1939
Feb. 1945
63
John Wright
Dec. 1939
Jun. 1944
55
Kenneth Hind
Oct. 1939
Aug. 1944
59
Vincent Hayward
Nov. 1939
Aug. 1940
10
John Ascroft
Dec. 1939
Sep. 1940
10
John Moss
Oct. 1939
Sep. 1941
24
George Dobson
Oct. 1939
Dec. 1939
3
       
1940
Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
Thomas A. Harrison
Jan. 1940
Aug. 1945
68
W. Ronald Iddon
Feb. 1940
Aug. 1945
67
Ernest Ball
Feb. 1940
Aug. 1945
67
Daniel H. Stazicker
Feb. 1940
Aug. 1945
67
Charles E. Wright
Mar. 1940
Aug. 1945
66
Nicholas Dewhurst
Mar. 1940
Aug. 1945
66
Herbert Price
Apr. 1940
Aug. 1945
65
Henry Crook
Apr. 1940
Aug. 1945
65
John Tindsley
April 1940
Aug. 1945
65
Kenneth Robshaw
April 1940
Aug. 1945
65
Thomas Tindsley
May 1940
Aug. 1945
64
Thomas Harrison
May 1940
Aug. 1945
64
Frank Timperley
June 1940
Aug. 1945
63
George O. Burns
June 1940
Aug. 1945
63
Henry Cookson
June 1940
Aug. 1945
63
William Benjamin
June 1940
Aug. 1945
63
Thomas Herbert Barron
June 1940
Aug. 1945
63
Ronald Sergeant
June 1940
Aug. 1945
63
Norman Barron
July 1940
Aug. 1945
62
Frank McKean
July 1940
Aug. 1945
62
Thomas Fazackerley
July 1940
Aug. 1945
62
Thomas Coulton (M.B.)
Aug. 1940
Oct. 1940
3
John Rowland
Aug. 1940
Aug. 1945
61
Harry I. Taylor
Aug. 1940
Aug. 1945
61
James Parkinson
Aug. 1940
Aug. 1945
61
Harry Harrison
Oct. 1940
Aug. 1945
59
Fred Forshaw
Oct. 1940
Aug. 1945
59
Gerrard Pendlebury
Oct. 1940
Aug. 1945
59
Ronald Melling
Oct. 1940
Aug. 1945
59
John Pickervance
Nov. 1940
Aug. 1945
58
Ernest Nicholson
June 1940
Aug. 1945
63
Richard Parker
July 1940
R.I.P.
72
William Molyneux
Nov. 1940
June 1942
20
John J. Hague
May 1940
Aug. 1945
64
Harold Melling
Feb. 1940
April 1940
3
Dennis Johnson
April 1940
Disabled
72
William Wright
Oct. 1940
Aug. 1945
59
James Latham
Sept. 1940
R.I.P.
72
Harry Rigby
Nov. 1940
Aug. 1945
58
William Sutton
Dec. 1940
Aug. 1945
57
Richard Harrison
Dec. 1940
Aug. 1945
57
Thomas Walsh
April 1940
Aug. 1945
65
Eric R. Hind
Feb. 1940
Aug. 1945
67
Thomas Coulton
Dec 1940
Aug. 1945
57
Iowerth Davies
Dec. 1940
Aug.1945
57
Thomas Johnson
Dec. 1940
Nov. 1942
36
       
1941
Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
Matthew Sutton
Jan. 1941
Aug. 1945
56
Walter H. Rawsthorne
Feb. 1941
Aug. 1945
55
Charles Martin
Feb. 1941
Aug. 1945
55
William Parkinson
Mar. 1941
Aug. 1945
54
Leslie Hodson
Mar. 1941
Aug. 1945
54
Edwin Johnson
Mar. 1941
Aug. 1945
54
Henry Caunce
Apr. 1941
Jan. 1942
10
William Harrison
Apr. 1941
Aug. 1945
53
Henry Iddon
May 1941
Aug. 1945
52
Robert Moss
May 1941
R.I.P.
72
Alfred Rowland
Jun. 1941
Aug. 1945
51
Thomas Dandy
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
Frederick Pollard
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
Thomas Parkinson
Jul. 1941
R.I.P.
72
George Hunter
Feb. 1941
R.I.P.
72
Ronald Knight
Dec. 1941
Sep. 1942
10
Richard Gabbott
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
John Ball
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
Thomas Smith
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
William A. E. Riding
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
Nicholas Forshaw
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
Henry Devitt
Jul. 1941
Aug. 1945
50
Edwin Barron
Aug. 1941
Aug. 1945
47
John Marsden
Aug. 1941
Aug. 1945
49
Philip Rigby
Aug. 1941
Aug. 1945
49
Thomas Southworth
Aug. 1941
Aug. 1945
49
Thomas Spencer
Sep. 1941
Aug. 1945
48
John Iddon
Oct. 1941
Aug. 1945
47
William Ellison
Oct. 1941
Aug. 1945
47
Richard A. Burns
Nov. 1941
Aug. 1945
46
Hugh Rowland
Nov. 1941
Aug. 1945
46
Ronald Johnson
Nov. 1941
Dec. 1944
38
Stanley Quinlan
Aug. 1941
Aug. 1945
49
Sidney Rutter
Oct. 1941
Jan. 1943
16
Arthur Forshaw
Sep. 1941
Feb. 1943
18
John G. Moss
May 1941
Aug. 1945
52
       
1942
Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
Robert Parkinson
Jan. 1942
Aug. 1945
44
Roger Ward
jan. 1942
Aug. 1945
44
Leslie Carr
Feb. 1942
Oct. 1943
21
Robert Bond
Feb.1942
Aug. 1945
43
Albert Becconsall
Apr. 1942
Aug. 1945
41
Robert H. Barron
Mar.1942
Aug. 1945
42
Francis Cairns
Mar. 1942
Aug. 1945
42
Lewis Clark
Mar. 1942
Aug. 1945
42
Richard Blundell
Apr. 1942
Aug. 1945
41
Kenneth Dandy
Apr. 1942
Aug. 1945
41
Frederick A. Taylor
May 1942
Aug. 1945
40
Nicholas Taylor
May 1942
Aug. 1945
40
John Hornby
May 1942
Aug. 1945
40
Harry Woosey
May 1942
Aug. 1945
40
Hugh Melling
Jun. 1942
Aug. 1945
39
Alan Barnes
Jun. 1942
Aug. 1945
24
Charles Wright
Jun. 1942
May 1944
39
James Sutton
Jun. 1942
R.I.P.
72
John Sutton
Jun. 1942
Aug. 1945
39
Richard Townsley
July 1942
Aug. 1945
38
Harold Pilkington
July 1942
Aug. 1945
38
James Harrison
July 1942
Aug. 1945
38
Sidney Ball
Aug. 1942
Aug. 1945
37
Stanley G. Frazer
Aug. 1942
Aug. 1945
37
Arthur Worth
Aug. 1942
Aug. 1945
37
John F. Webster
Aug. 1942
Aug. 1945
37
Arthur H. Procter
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
John H. Edmondson
Mar. 1942
May 1944
27
Albert Melling
July 1942
Aug. 1945
38
William Dobson
May 1942
Oct. 1942
6
Albert Fawke
April 1942
Aug. 1945
41
Robert Hull
Sept. 1942
Aug. 1945
36
William Hudson
Sept. 1942
Aug. 1945
36
Robert Johnson
Sept. 1942
Aug. 1945
36
Henry Alty
Oct. 1942
Aug. 1945
35
Dr. Herbert Croft
Oct. 1942
Aug. 1945
35
Edward Harrison
Nov. 1942
Aug. 1945
34
Eric Edmondson
Sept. 1942
Aug. 1945
36
Robert Latham
Nov. 1942
Aug. 1945
34
Harry Iddon
Nov. 1942
Aug. 1945
34
William Barker
Nov. 1942
Aug. 1945
34
Jeffrey Wignall
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
Arthur Barron
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
John Caunce
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
Herbert Parkinson
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
William Harrison
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
Thomas Dickinson
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
David Hanson
Oct. 1942
Aug. 1945
35
Henry Forsythe
Dec. 1942
Aug. 1945
33
       
1943
Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
James Southern
Jan. 1943
Aug. 1945
32
Thomas Sutton
Feb. 1943
Aug. 1945
31
Harry Lund
Feb. 1943
Aug. 1945
31
Henry Moss
April 1943
Aug. 1945
29
Alexander Laing
Mar. 1943
Aug. 1945
30
John Twist
April 1943
Aug. 1945
29
Peter Fay
May 1943
Aug. 1945
28
Joseph Rush
June 1943
Aug. 1945
27
Eric Abram
June 1943
Aug. 1945
27
William Lowe
June 1943
Aug. 1945
27
Fred Bentham
June 1943
Aug. 1945
27
Robert Howard
July 1943
Aug. 1945
26
John L. Croft
July 1943
Aug. 1945
26
Maurice Haskell
Aug. 1943
Aug. 1945
25
John Hodge
Sept. 1943
Aug. 1945
24
Edwin Hodson
Sept. 1943
Aug. 1945
24
Walter Ascroft
Oct. 1943
Aug. 1945
23
Arthur Barron
Nov. 1943
Aug. 1945
22
George Wait
Nov. 1943
Aug. 1945
22
John Ashcroft
Nov. 1943
Aug. 1945
22
Edward Farrell
Nov. 1943
Aug. 1945
22
Ronald Iddon
Nov. 1943
Aug. 1945
22
William Eric Bell
Nov. 1943
Aug. 1945
22
David Rimmer
Dec. 1943
Aug. 1945
21
Stanley Shaw

Dec. 1943

Aug. 1945
21
 
1944
Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
William Harrison
Mar. 1944
Aug. 1945
18
Frank Procter
Mar. 1944
Aug. 1945
18
William Whittle
Jun. 1944
Aug. 1945
15
Frederick L. Burns
Aug. 1944
Aug. 1945
13
Robert J. Edmondson
Sep. 1944
Aug. 1945
12
Norman Wright
Jul. 1944
Aug. 1945
14
Frank Foulds
Nov. 1944
Aug. 1945
10
James Monaghan
Nov. 1944
Aug. 1945
10
Alan Jay
Jan. 1944
Aug. 1945
20
William Hull
Apr. 1944
Aug. 1945

17

 
1945
Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
Joseph Brown
Apr. 1945
Aug. 1945
5
James West
Apr. 1945
Aug. 1945
5
Arnold Bailey
Jul. 1945
Aug. 1945

2

       

THE WOMENS SERVICES

Name
Enlistment
Discharge
Months
1939
Alice Iddon,
(nee Fazackerley)
Aug. 1939
Aug. 1941
25
1940
Maggie S. Vickers
(nee Stazicker)
Feb. 1940
Oct. 1941
21
Mary H. Backhouse,
(nee Coulton)
Nov. 1940
Aug. 1945
58
1941
Martha Grayson,
(nee West)
April 1941
Mar. 1945
24
Hilda Prescott
June 1941
Aug. 1945
51
Alice Bentham
July 1941
Aug. 1945
50
Margaret Moss
Sept. 1941
Aug. 1945
48
Eleanor Russell,
(nee Pearson)
Sept. 1941
Mar. 1945
43
Vera Millward,
(nee Iddon)
Dec. 1941
Aug. 1945
45
Eva Foulds
Dec. 1941
Aug. 1945
45
1942
Evelyn Wilkinson,
(nee Taylor)
April 1942
Jan. 1944
22
Elsie Winstanley
Sept. 1942
Aug. 1945
36
Lilian Dobson
July 1942
Aug. 1945
38
1943
Agnes Swift,
(nee Rigby)
Mar. 1943
Aug. 1945
30
Nellie Wilkinson,
(nee Pendlebury)
April 1943
Aug. 1945
29
Ann Barron
Sept. 1943
Aug. 1945
24
Rose Twist
July 1943
June 1944
12
Josephine Keane
April 1943
Aug. 1945
29
1944
Pamela Fairey
Jan. 1944
Aug. 1945
20
Florence Muriel Hind
June 1944
Aug. 1945
15

__________


TARLETON WELCOME AND WELFARE FUND

Receipts
 
£
s.
d.
To Subscriptions and Donations
1569
14
4
Special Efforts
2217
12
8
Bank Interest
15
0
6
 
£3802
7
6
Payments
 
£
s.
d.
By Balance at District Bank, Ltd., to be divided between members at the rate of 7/6d for each month's service
3802
7
6
 
£3802
7
6

I have examined the books and other documents of the Tarleton Welcome and Welfare Fund and I certify the above account to be in accordance with the books and information supplied to me and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.

H. H. SANDERSON,
Chartered Accountant,
PRESTON.

17th August, 1946.

 

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