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RECTOR'S WEEKLY NEWS
April 9th 1943

My dear Boys and Girls,
I came across this in a paper the other day and thought it would interest you; it is also very instructive.
"Crews of many of our motor torpedo boats and motor gun boats on the south and east Coasts are using a section of the "Breton Fisherman's Prayer" when dedicating their ships.
'O God be good to me. The sea is so wide and my ship is so small' is the English translation of the section they use.
In many small wardrooms the original French version is inscribed on a brass plate and hung on the wall."
With my love and my Blessing,
Ever your affectionate friend,
L. N. FORSE.

HOME FRONT NEWS.
Mrs. Holdcroft, Hesketh Lane, who has been ill for some time, died on Saturday and was buried at Tarleton Churchyard on Wednesday. She was 80 years of age, Mrs. Hugh Southworth, Hesketh Lane, died very suddenly early on Sunday morning and was buried at Tarleton Churchyard on Wednesday. She was 79 years of age.
Congratulations to Sergt. Major (H.G.) David Ball who has been promoted and given a Commission as 2nd Lt. in the Home Guard. Also to Corpl. Nick Taylor, who has been promoted Sergeant. Also to 2nd Lt. Stanley Baldwin promoted to full Lt. He is now abroad. And to Bert Price promoted to L/Cpl.
Betty Hewitson (Hoole) has joined the A.T.S.
John Ball, Bretherton, works for Garlicks, joins the R.A.F. next week. Gunner Jimmy Farrington (Walmer Bridge), who is in North Africa, was playing in a football match in the desert, against a team which came from nearly 200 miles away, when he spotted his cousin Bobby Chadwick, who lives next door to him in Walmer Bridge, in the opposing team. Jimmy has been in the M.E.F. for three years and Bobby for two months. His cousin was the first local lad Jimmy had seen since landing in the Middle East.
Kenneth Hind writes that he has arrived safely in North Africa. Fred Forshaw has gone abroad. Henry Moss, Smithy, Mere Brow, has joined the Army. Mrs. Tom Hurst (nee Janey Gooden) Hesketh Lane, is very seriously ill in Preston Infirmary.

On Leave:
Sid Ball and John Caunce and Edwin Crabtree on embarkation. Tom Tindsley and Bert Price on seven days. News has been received that William Stringfellow, who was reported missing from his ship when she was sunk by enemy action, is a prisoner of war in Japanese hands.
Mrs. Knight, who underwent an operation in Southport infirmary, is now recovered and comes out next week. Sergt. Ernie Ball is home on leave, and his wife has come up from Luton to be with him.
Leslie Orrit and Eddie Dalton of Hoole have both been on leave last week.
We regret to have to record that the little baby of Mrs. Buck (nee Louis Alty) of Hoole died last week.

EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS:
Sapper John Johnson says "Recently I have been attending lectures and debates which are held weekly. Tonight the subject is "Democracy and Communism". I always enjoy listening to an educated person discussing an interesting subject. Things are definitely better now than in the last war; the men are cleaner, both bodily, and I can safely say, spiritually. I think that the men will return to civilian life with more ambition, and a lot more interest in the welfare of their country."
Vernon Ogden R.N. writes "I met Chief Petty Officer Jack Hornby, B.E.M. and we had a good night together. He is the first person from the village I have met since I left home, and I can tell you, sir, we had a little chat about you. This is a nice place, but the town is very small; one pub, two chip shops, no pictures".
Lt. Stanley Baldwin sends an airgraph from the East saying "The trip out was grand after getting out of the rough period experienced during the first week. You will be surprised to learn that I have already got my second pip, which is good after being so short a time commissioned. I am indeed happy in my old regiment. I feel that this is going to be a great experience for all of us. On the ship I found Capt. James Cook as ship's adjutant". (Capt. James Cook is the solicitor, he lived in a house at the corner of Moss Lane.)
Pte. John Rimmer sends a picture post card with a short note thereon saying "Many thanks for the N.L. which I receive regularly. Please note my change of address as I have written before stating same." Please give my regards to all the Tarleton lads in the Forces". ACW/1 Vera Iddon, W.A.A.F., writes "Although my letters are few and far between, I want you to know I appreciate very much all you are doing for us. We are in a very lonely spot here, in a valley, it seems awfully quiet after being in a town. The Air Force provides all the entertainment; we are detailed in our turns to go to the pictures or to a dance. Transport is provided to take us and bring us back, or I think we would get lost among the hills. Since I came here I have not seen a Church, but sometimes the padre comes to see us and I always enjoy his visit. Please remember me to all the boys and girls in the Forces, especially my brother in law Arthur Harrison, my cousin Jack Robinson, and also to Walter Rawsthorne in Canada".
Dvr. Jack Robinson writes from overseas to say "You will see from my address that I have been on the move. We are alright here but quiet. We get plenty of pictures in camp and concerts; they help to pass the time alright. Why I moved was because the padre had to go and he asked me if I would like to go with him. He has been very good to me, and that is very good nowadays. Please remember me to all the boys and girls in the Forces and to all those working so hard for us at home."
O.A. James Sutton R.N., writes "This is only a makeshift address and I am sorry to say that I dare not tell you anything about what I am doing or anything about the place, so it will just have to be a short note until I get settled again somewhere. I am sorry that I have not been able to write often to you, but you will understand O.K."
Dvr. Robert Latham says "I am on a Driver Mechanic's Course at present and I find it very interesting. It really is remarkable how the N.L. follows me around seeing that I keep changing my address, but they are very welcome. Please remember me to Bob Hull and Harold Pilkington. I haven't seen them since I joined up."
O/S Hugh Sutton, (R.N.) (Bretherton) writes "I don't get much time for writing because all those who cannot swim have to go for swimming lessons and I am one of them. Both Ken Dandy and I are settling down now; we both felt a bit homesick at first, but we have got over that. I can't thank you enough for showing us the way round the London Tubes. I don't know what we should have done without you, because neither Ken nor I have travelled in them before."
AC David Hanson, R.A.F. says "It is perfectly true what Mrs. Harry Sutton said in her poem, and I think she deserves praising for a very homely verse. The way in which it is written brings Tarleton to me almost as though I were there with you all. It seemed quite a coincidence that the same afternoon that I read in your N.L. that Sid Cookson (H.B.) was on the same camp as myself, I came across him; I suppose you can guess the rest when two Tarleton lads meet. I have been incorporating sunbathing with my studies this afternoon. The time is going like wildfire. Will you please remember me to Jimmy and Bill Harrison, of Kearsley, and to John Pickervance and Herbert Parkinson, my old work mates. Gunner Tom Fazackerley writes "I must thank you for the card; it is lovely and we have pinned it up in our Mess room and it makes us all feel very near home. I must tell you about the Service we had on Thursday afternoon. The padre came he has done away with parades and I agree with him and we had a short Service in our Mess Room. We had two hymns, "Rock of Ages" and "There is a green hill", some prayers and a short talk. We are looking forward to him coming again".
O/S Ken Dandy says "Every morning we fall in on the parade ground and sing a hymn and say a few prayers. The padre stands on a big platform at one end of the square and speaks through a microphone. On Sundays it is Church for everyone; We don't have an organ, but the Royal Marines Band plays. It is always very interesting and I quite enjoy it. Please give my best wishes to my brother Tom in the R.A.F. and my brother in law Bill Bridge."
Pte. Will Seddon says "You will see from my address that I have moved back down south; but I am ready for getting away from here because there are too many raiders coming over for my liking. I have received the poem composed by Mrs. Harry Sutton and I think it very good, and well worth saving. Please remember me to Harold Aspey and Dick Burns." `
AC 2 Freddy Coupe writes from overseas to say "Tonight I am feeling a bit fed up with life, so I thought I would sit down and write a letter. I have been working very hard. I arranged to meet Jack Robinson, but he did not turn up, so I expect he did not get my letter in time. I would be pleased if you would remember me to Malcolm Parkinson, who is home from Canada, and also to Roger Watson, who has moved to a tough spot". (You will see, Freddy, from Jack Robinson's letter why he was unable to meet you as suggested. He and the padre were on the move,)
Gunner Harry Woosey says "They have given me a Staff job; I am on night duty and look after all the boilers. I keep the fires going all night, so I am not hard pressed. I have touched for a smashing job and am looking well after it."

 
 

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