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History and Recollections
of TARLETON

Janet Dandy
Published in 1985 By Carnegie Press Copyright © Janet Dandy
Reproduced for reference only

Dialect

The Lancashire dialect was widely spoken in Tarleton. Some words are of Old English Origin, eg. 'gate' meaning a road, as in Blackgate Lane, a black road: or 'I will take you agate', meaning 'I will set you on the road', or 'agate with my work'.Ousel, throstle and dunnock, names for blackbird, thrush and housesparrow, were used in Shakespearean verse. Some are corruptions of Old English words. The following were common in Tarleton:

 

to rappock
to be noisy and upset things
to kale
to be served before your turn
witchet
wet shod
powd
hair cut, from the word poll (a head)
aliker
vinigar
moithered
to be bothered or worried
a quarrel
pane of glass in a window
to fettle
to mend
to clod
to throw
to clam
to starve for want of food
a laiche
a puddle in the road
to prate
to talk back cheekily
chin cough
whooping cough
to brewer
plants just shooting out of the ground
brewered
hat brim
to sken
to squint
galasses
braces
brat
an apron
to screet
to cry
to be monly
to be proud
to raumus
to talk foolishly
fow
ugly
to bree someone
to frighten someone
shive
a slice of bread
welly
nearly or almost
gawping
staring with open mouth
to snutter
to stumble
hutch up
sit close to someone
to conster
to argue
to go mazy
to be dizzy
a wooker
a thread hanging from a dress or a stray hair
 

 

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